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    Celebrating #StayInForLGBT at Pride 2020

    10/06/2020
    Let's take this time to celebrate our past, present and future LGBT+ community!

    The pivotal role of Black LGBT people in Western LGBT history is documented but often forgotten.

    From Marsha P. Johnson and Stormé DeLarverie who were major figures in the Stonewall uprisings of 1969, to modern day LGBT leaders like Munroe Bergdorf and Lady Phyll, Black people have always paved the way for LGBT liberation.

    Our own LGBT+ communities should be a welcoming haven of safety, but for many of us who are QTIPOC [Queer, Trans and Intersex People of Colour] we often don’t quite fit in in our newly found community as well as facing a lack of acceptance in the community we grew up in.

    A Stonewall survey found that 51% of BAME [Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic] LGBT people reported having experienced racism in the LGBT+ community; this number rises to 61% for Black LGBT people.

    The following video discusses the experiences of Black LGBT people as well as other LGBT people of colour.

    Therefore, it raises the question: How can we make our communities more inclusive and welcoming — however they manifest themselves online or in person — so we can start to bridge the gap?”

    It is important that anyone who wants to be an ally to Black LGBT+ people:

    • Listens to the voices of a community that have been historically erased
    • Supports those communities by recognising the privilege that they have and weaponising it to ensure that all members of the LGBT+ community are included
    • Showcases the community, be it in the workplace, in social spaces or just in your personal lives.

    Which Pride Flag will you be celebrating Pride with?

    No matter where you are celebrating, you'll be seeing all sorts of flags — and not just those in the traditional rainbow. There are many sexualities and gender identities on the queer spectrum, and we would like to share flags for each.

    Join our #StayInForLGBT at Pride campaign

    June is here, which means the glitter is out, the placards are in the making and members of the LGBT+ community are ready to shout about Pride and celebrate our identities.

    Even if we are not able to walk in London's Pride parade, nor share celebrations with our huge and diverse community, it won't stop us being proud of who we are.

    We are still here, still queer and ready to cheer (even if it's through a screen)!

    If you would like to show Middlesex that you are proud of your LGBT+ identity or are a proud ally (and are happy for it to be shared on social media).

    Join our #StayInForLGBT at Pride campaign by following these steps:

    1. Take a landscape picture of you celebrating Pride in your own way at home! You could include a flag that represents you or capture an image of you holding up a placard or sign that describes who you are.

    Type ‘LGBT flags’ into your search engine and print one off or make your own. (This image is an example of the kind of pictures we'd like to see, but feel free to add your own creative touches!)

    2. Send this image to lgbt@mdx.ac.uk with the subject title #StayInForLGBT. The address you use to email will be retained to share the images with you at the end of Pride month but will be deleted immediately after.

    Campus Pride 20203. Share this message with friends, classmates and networks within Middlesex to spread the word and make sure everyone who would like to be is included.

    4. Keep an eye out on social media to see your happy, proud face at the end of the month!

    5. Join us in celebrating Campus Pride – a digital festival for university staff and students across the UK!

    Sunday 28 June is the deadline to submit a picture for #StayInForLGBT campaign

    Send to lgbt@mdx.ac.uk | Subject: #StayInForLGBT

    On Wednesday 24 June we have our next coffee morning – students as well as staff are welcome to join us.

    Related stories:
    Further LGBT+ resources:

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