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    The EU Referendum/Brexit

    In a referendum on 23 June 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union.

    The Government made the following announcement on 11 October 2016 that "European Union students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year will still have access to student funding support".

    Middlesex welcomed the Government's confirmation of continued EU student funding for 2018/19.

    At Middlesex we value our students from across Europe and the ways they enrich our community and our campus life. We are determined to preserve the diversity of our University and remain welcoming to people from across the world.

    We are committed to supporting our current students through any challenges that arise as the Brexit negotiations go forward and as any actions take place. Please check back regularly for ongoing updates, announcements and news.

    For more information see the International Students webpages.

    The resources below are at your disposal if you would like further help and advice in relation to welfare matters.

    There are further details in the FAQs and statements from our Vice-Chancellor below.

    • Previous statements from our Vice-Chancellor

      • View Professor Tim Blackman's statement from 29 March 2017

        Today the Prime Minister has triggered Article 50 of the Lisbon treaty which signifies the formal start of the two-year negotiation for the terms of Britain’s exit from the European Union. While it is important to stress that the UK will remain a member of the EU for the next two years with no immediate change for universities, I know that the triggering of Article 50 may concern some of you. With this in mind, I thought it would be helpful to provide an update on some key areas that will be of importance to you, and reassure you that the University will continue to work with a range of organisations to ensure the best possible outcome from the negotiations.

        EU staff

        The immigration status of EU staff has not changed as a result of the referendum vote.  This will remain the case until the Government decides otherwise.

        Current EU students

        At this stage there is no reason to assume any change to the immigration status of EU students and the UK government has confirmed that there will be no change to access to student loans.

        EU students with a place to start in academic year 2017/18

        At this stage there is no reason to assume any change to the immigration status of EU students planning to commence studies in 2017/18 and the UK government has confirmed that there will be no change to access to student loans.

        EU students studying in the UK under the Erasmus programme

        The immigration status of Erasmus students has not changed, and they continue to be eligible for their Erasmus grant until at least as long as we remain a member of the EU and could well be extended beyond this.

        UK students studying in the EU and elsewhere under the Erasmus programme

        The immigration status of UK students currently studying under the Erasmus programme has not changed and they continue to be eligible for their Erasmus grant until at least as long as we remain a member of the EU and could well be extended beyond this.

        All staff currently undertaking EU funded projects

        Until the process of exit negotiations has concluded, the UK will remain a member of the EU, and a full participating member of the Horizon 2020 programme. The exit negotiations could take up to two years following the triggering of Article 50.  In many cases, funds awarded to UK universities through these programmes in the months ahead will extend beyond the likely date of Brexit.  However, the UK government confirmed in a statement on 13 August 2016 that European Commission research grants, including Horizon 2020 programme grants, awarded while the UK is still a member of the EU will be guaranteed by the Treasury. This will be the case even when the project continues beyond the UK's departure from the EU.

        Next steps

        We continue to work closely with Universities UK (UUK) - an organisation representing UK universities - who are working pro-actively with the UK Government, the European Commission and other relevant agencies to secure a positive outcome from negotiations for UK universities and in particular:

        • Confirmation that EU students starting a course in 201819 and 2019/20 will continue to be eligible for home fee status, and be eligible for loans and grants
        • Confirmation of rights to reside and work in the UK post-exit for EU nationals that are currently working in the university sector and their dependents

        At Middlesex, we want to continue to bring staff and students from across Europe to our University because they enrich our community and our campus life. I am determined to do all I can to preserve the diversity of our University and our welcome to people from across the world.

        We will continue working closely with UUK and the broader sector to understand and mitigate the risks to Middlesex as the negotiations unfold and will provide further updates as these challenging issues are addressed.

        Tim Blackman

        Vice-Chancellor

      • View Professor Tim Blackman's statement from 26 June 2016

          A global outlook is a defining characteristic of our vibrant and diverse University and we are proud to have students and staff from more than 140 countries as part of our Middlesex community.

          Following today’s EU Referendum result, we will continue to support and champion the valuable contribution that everyone makes to Middlesex. Although the outcome is not the one that our Board of Governors and no doubt many of you would have wished for, we respect the decision of the UK electorate.

          Leaving the EU will not happen overnight. There will be a gradual exit process, and we will work with other universities and the UK Government to ensure there is as little disruption as possible. The next step for the UK is to enter into a two-year negotiation with the other Member States, during which time the terms of the UK’s exit from the EU will be decided, as well as what European cooperative arrangements the UK will stay part of.

          Until we are able to receive further clarity on the broader implications, I thought it would be helpful to clarify some key areas:

          • - Current EU students - The immigration status and associated fee status of our current EU students, as well as access to student loans, have not changed as a result of the vote. Middlesex University has taken the decision to maintain your current level of EU fees for the remainder of your course.

            Student Finance England has also announced that EU nationals who are currently studying here, and who are eligible to receive loans/or grants from them will continue to receive these loans until the end of their course. You can read the full text of their statement here.

          • - EU students with a place to start in academic year 2016/17 - At this stage there is no reason to assume any change to your immigration status and the UK government has confirmed that there will be no change to your access to student loans. Middlesex University has also taken the decision to maintain your current level of EU fees for the entirety of your course.
          • - EU students with a place to start in academic year 2017/18 - At this stage there is no reason to assume any change to your immigration status and the UK government has confirmed that there will be no change to your access to student loans.
          • - EU students studying in the UK under the Erasmus programme - The immigration status of Erasmus students has not changed, and you will continue to be eligible for your Erasmus grant until at least as long as we remain a member of the EU, and possibly beyond this.
          • - UK students studying in the EU and elsewhere under the Erasmus programme - The immigration status of UK students currently studying under the Erasmus programme has not changed, and you continue to be eligible for your Erasmus grant until at least as long as we remain a member of the EU, and possibly beyond this.
            The umbrella body for UK universities, Universities UK (UUK), is liaising with the British Council as National Agency for Erasmus+ and the University has been advised to check the Erasmus+ websites regularly for updates, including student-focused communications.

          Next steps
          We will continue working closely with Universities UK and the broader sector to understand and mitigate the risks to Middlesex, and will provide further updates as these issues are addressed. Universities UK have now produced a summary of frequently asked questions, which you can access via their website.

    • FAQs

      • What does Brexit mean for me?

        - Regardless of whether the UK is in or outside the European Union (EU), UK universities are international communities, welcoming and benefiting from students from all over the world. EU and international staff and students are and will always be an integral part of university life.

        -The UK’s relationship with the EU is changing as a result of the UK vote to leave, but it is not ending – staff and students from the EU will continue to be welcome.

        - The UK Government started the two-year negotiation process for leaving the EU on 29 March 2017, meaning that the UK is due to leave the EU in March 2019. Until the exit negotiations have been completed, the UK will continue to be a member of the EU, meaning it will maintain the same rights and obligations as all the other member states.

        - While the UK remains a member of the EU, students studying at UK universities will continue to pay the same fees as UK students and will be eligible for tuition fee loans and grants.

      • What impact will Brexit have on fees?

          Current EU students

          Across all UK nations, current EU students, including those to start courses in the 2017–18 academic year will continue to pay the same fees as UK students (free undergraduate tuition in the case of Scotland) and will be eligible to receive loans and grants for the full duration of their courses. This will be the case even if their course finishes after the UK has left the EU.

          2018–19 starters

          Those applying to courses starting in the 2018–19 academic year will also continue to pay the same fees as UK students (free tuition in the case of Scotland) and will be eligible to receive loans and grants to fund their studies for the full duration of their courses in England, Wales and Scotland. As with 2017–18 students, this will be the case even if the course finishes after the UK has left the EU.

          Those starting once the UK has left the EU

          The fees that EU students starting courses at UK universities after the UK has left the EU are required to pay and their entitlement to loans will depend on what is agreed as part of the UK’s exit negotiations. UK universities will continue to highlight the value of EU students to UK higher education and to British students. Regardless of the outcome of the negotiations, students from all corners of the world will continue to be welcome.

      • Can EU students continue to come to the UK on the Erasmus+ exchange programme?

        Yes. Current Erasmus+ students, including those taking part this coming academic year (2017–18) and the next (2018–19) at UK universities will still be eligible to participate in Erasmus+ exchanges. Universities UK is urging the UK Government to
        prioritise negotiating continued access to the Erasmus+ programme.

      • Will there still be opportunities for students from the EU to come to UK universities once the UK has left the EU?

        Yes. UK universities have always and will always welcome staff and students from across the world. Leaving the EU does not change this. The UK’s future relationship with the EU will depend on negotiations between the UK Government and the EU. However, UK universities are committed to promoting the value of EU students, student exchange programmes, as well as the importance of ensuring EU students can continue to study in the UK without unnecessary burden in the future.

      • How will Brexit affect my immigration status?

        Current students who are EU citizens (and those joining for the 2019/20 academic year) will be able to apply to live and study in the UK, and once you have been here for five years, you will be able to apply for settled status. You will be able to apply for a temporary residence permit allowing you to complete the five year period. If you do not qualify for settled status you can be granted pre-settled status.

      • How can I apply for the EU Settlement Scheme?

        The UK Government’s EU Settlement Scheme allows EU citizens to continue to study, work and live in the UK post-Brexit. A pilot of this scheme is currently open to EU Students and the UK Government announced that it will waive the £65 application fee for pre-settled/settled status when the scheme is fully rolled out on 30 March 2019.  Those who apply during the current pilot phase of the scheme will receive a fee reimbursement directly from the Home Office in due course.

        More information can be found on the Government’s website.

        The Government has developed an app called EU Exit: ID Document Check for EU citi­zens to use to verify their identity as part of their application for the EU Settlement Scheme.

        Because this app only works on Android phones, the University has purchased some compatible devices that are free to use for all students and staff who wish to apply for their settled or pre-settled status. No personal data will be held on the phones.

        The phones are available at the main campus reception in the Quad during normal opening hours: Monday to Friday 8.00 - 19.00.

        The App has been downloaded and the instructions printed out. Reception staff will be able to assist with any queries applicants may have with the app. More information about the app can be found on the Government’s website.

      • Will my tuition fees or loans change?

        All current EU students will still be eligible for home fee status and financial support / loans for tuition for the duration of your studies at Middlesex.

      • Will I be able to stay and work in the UK once I have finished my studies?

        Current EU students  will be able to apply for a temporary residence permit, and once you have been in the UK for 5 years, you can apply for settled status. Both the temporary residence permit and settled status give you the right to live and work in the UK.

      • Will I have to pay for medical care?

        Both the temporary residence permit and settled status give you access to public services, including medical care under the NHS.

      • Will I still be able to go on Erasmus / Exchange after Brexit?

        All students currently on an exchange this academic year will have their funding protected, even in the case of a No Deal Brexit. Whilst there is some uncertainty about funding for the Erasmus programme in the future, there will still be opportunities for students to study abroad. A lot of student exchanges already take place outside of the Erasmus+ programme. If you are scheduled to go on an exchange next academic year (e.g. for a compulsory module), more details will be sent to you.

        Whilst the information here is correct at the time of circulation, and the UK Government has made a number of commitments, there is always the possibility of future changes and so all students are advised to regularly check the gov.uk websites referenced here.  If there are further changes we will provide updates via Unihelp.

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