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    Academic Integrity

    What do we mean by Academic Integrity?

    Academic integrity is a quality that demonstrates values such as honesty, fairness and respect for others and their work. Academic integrity is evident by the behaviours we exhibit.

    In order to demonstrate academic integrity, you must be able to demonstrate for example originality (independent thinking) and criticality (critical thinking), which you will be supported to develop whilst you complete your studies.

    You will demonstrate academic integrity by producing your own work, clearly acknowledging any material that has been included from other sources or through collaboration.

    Students must also present their own findings, conclusions or data based on appropriate and ethical practice.

    Academic misconduct is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not. It includes, but is not limited to, plagiarism, commissioning or buying work from a third party or copying the work of others.

    Why is it important?

    Demonstrating academic integrity is a highly valued graduate attribute as it shows that you work in a professional and ethical way.

    Through your studies you will be supported in developing appropriate academic behaviours and skills to succeed.

    Students who fail to meet these standards will face disciplinary action, which could lead to expulsion from the University. Each year, around 15-20 students are expelled due to a breach of academic integrity.

    Other disciplinary actions could include:

    • Revoking a previously awarded degree
    • Having to repeat a module
    • Being awarded a lower level qualification

    Support

    The Learning Enhancement Team (LET) are a team of specialists here to help you get the most out of your time at University, giving you the tools and support you need to excel in all aspects of your studies.

    You can speak to us face-to-face at our LET Open Workshops, and in our LET Tutorials. You can also access our support via our online resources.

    Policy and Procedures

    Policy and Procedures for Academic Integrity

    University Regulations

    University regulations and policies - full version

    Section F: Academic Integrity and Misconduct

    Section G: Appeal Regulations and Procedures

    Section J: Middlesex University Qualifications

    Student Conduct and Discipline Rules

    Student Complaints and Grievance Procedures

    • FAQs

      • What behaviours falls under academic misconduct?

        Academic misconduct is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.

        This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are:

        1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  

        2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3rd party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).

        3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work.

        4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.

        <p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p>kkjhhh<p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p>FAQs

        FAQs
        FAQs
        <p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p><p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p><p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p><p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p><p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p><p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p><p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p><p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p><p><strong>Academic misconduct</strong> is a breach of the values of academic integrity, and can occur when a student cheats in an assessment, or attempts to deliberately mislead an examiner that the work presented is their own when it is not.</p><p><em>This is not an exhaustive list, but the most common behaviours that fall under academic misconduct are: </em></p><p><em>1. Plagiarism - producing work that is not entirely your own efforts; taking the work of others and passing it off as your own, eg copying the words of others without acknowledgement/referencing the source/s. This could occur through negligence or deliberate action.  </em></p><p><em>2. Commissioning or buying work from a 3<sup>rd</sup> party (commonly known as ‘Contract Cheating’ and ‘Ghost Writing’).</em></p><p><em>3. Collusion – working with another or other students in presenting substantially similar work. </em></p><p><em>4. Cheating in an exam – taking unauthorised material in to an exam (eg crib notes) or any other infringement of the examination room rules.</em></p>FAQs
      • I have received an allegation of academic misconduct. What do I do next?

          You are advised to read all the documentation that has been emailed to you.  The guidance notes explain the academic misconduct process in detail and also outlines the options you can take. You need to respond to the allegation in writing using the ‘Student Response form’ within 10 working days of the date of the letter and your email.  You can get advice from the MDXSU for support in responding to academic misconduct studentadvice@mdx.ac.uk 0208 411 6450. You should also refer to the  University Regulations: Academic Integrity and Misconduct, section F.

        FAQs

      • What if I did not know I was cheating/did not intend to cheat?

        FAQs

        1. I was sanctioned for submitting the same work as the people from my group with whom I was allocated to work with. Why?

          This is because the Module tutor felt the commonality between the work exceeded the level in which you were permitted to work together.

        2. My friend copied my assignment. Am I in trouble? What do I do now?

        It is possible you will still be implicated in the case and as well as the other student, you may receive correspondence from Academic Misconduct (allegation letter, evidence etc), which you will be required to provide an honest response to.

        You will not be penalised if it is found that you are the originator of the work, but you may receive a warning re sharing your work with others in future.

      • What are the possible outcomes if I choose to

        FAQs

        1. Accept the allegation.

          The penalties vary depending on level of module, if it was a first or repeated offence and nature of misconduct. Please refer to the University Regulations: Academic Integrity and Misconduct, section F for details of the possible penalties.

        2. Deny the allegation

        If you deny the allegation and your responses are not accepted, it is likely a Panel of Investigation hearing will be held.

      • Could I be suspended for a second or subsequent violation of academic integrity?

        FAQs

        A second or subsequent offence, if you had received a previous written warning, may fall under either Category C or D, depending on the severity of the misconduct.  It is highly possible that a second or subsequent offence will lead to Expulsion from the University, but there are alternative penalties that can be applied. See section F5 ‘Categories and Penalties’ for a comprehensive list of possible outcomes.

      • Can I be sanctioned if I have already graduated?

        FAQs

        Yes, exceptionally, the University can retrospectively investigate cases of academic misconduct.

        .

      • Are the penalties the same for all the levels of HE?

        FAQs

        Penalties can vary depending on the level of the module in which the offence has taken place.

      • Will the academic misconduct go on my permanent transcript? What will this mean for my future career?

        FAQs

        No record of the academic misconduct will appear your final transcript.  The P grade (which denotes ‘academic misconduct proven) will be replaced with a grade 20 on the final transcript. However, the University may record the existence of warning points on any reference supplied.

      • Can I appeal against the outcome of academic misconduct?

        FAQs

        Yes you can submit an academic appeal against the academic misconduct outcome.  Details will be explained in the formal outcome letter in which you are advised to refer to the Academic Appeal regulations in UniHub and informed that you must submit your appeal within 10 working days of the date of the outcome letter.

      • Is the Appeals outcome the final decision?

        FAQs

        If your appeal is unsuccessful, you will be given the opportunity to have an internal review of your Appeal and following on from that you can forward your case to external adjudicators, the OIA.

      • What if I have further questions?

        FAQs

        For further questions, you can speak to the MDXSU and/or refer to the information on Academic Misconduct in UniHub.

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